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Pet Waste

Bring extra bags. Scoop every poop. Carry it to the trash.

 What’s the Problem?
Scoop poop

More information
Pet waste flyer (PDF, 947KB) - information on pet waste in Kirkland
The Scoop (PDF, 2MB) - Kirkland's Doggy Newsletter 
Kirkland Animal Services - License your pet, report lost and found pets

Pet Waste Golden RetrieverMore than 20,000 dogs of all shapes and sizes live in Kirkland. That’s a lot of dogs and a lot of dog poop– more than 6,000 pounds of poop per day!

Pet Waste Affects Health and Water Quality

Pet waste contains harmful organisms like E.coli, Giardia, and roundworms which that can be transmitted to people and pets if not cleaned up. 

When it rains, pet waste gets washed down the storm drain and into the nearest stream or lake. The organisms in dog waste can pollute our streams, creeks, and lakes, making our favorite places to swim and play unsafe.

What Can We Do?

Good HumanLuckily, the solution to this problem is quite simple. All you have to do is: 1. scoop your dog’s waste, 2. put it in a bag, 3. put it in the trash.

Scooping on walks: Keep a supply of bags near your dog’s leash. Use a bag dispenser that can be clipped to the leash. You can also use old newspaper, sandwich or bread bags. Tie bags to the leash if you don’t have pockets.
 
Scooping in the backyard: Use your poop-scooping tool of choice and bag your dog’s waste.

What are the yellow flags?
Yellow Flag Picture
Yellow Dog Poop Flags
Dog Walker with flags

 Visitors to Juanita Beach Park and Hazen Hills Park may notice hundreds of yellow flags dotting the landscape throughout October. Each yellow flag shows where un-scooped dog poop was left in the park over the past month - a whopping 270 piles of un-scooped dog poop! 

As part of a research effort funded by King Conservation District Member Jurisdictionlinks to external site grant program, City staff have been monitoring and counting un-scooped dog poop to see if these numbers decline after the installation of new dog poop bag stations and new education and outreach efforts. City staff are also monitoring the creek flowing through Hazen Hills Park for bacteria and canine bacteria DNA to evaluate the water quality impacts of dog poop. 

What Can Your Neighborhood Do?

You can enhance the safety and enjoyment of neighborhood common areas and other open spaces by sponsoring a pet waste station, making pet waste cleanup easy and convenient for dog owners.

Free pet waste stations are available for homeowner associations, neighborhood associations and homeowners within our city limits. One station will be distributed per sponsor. The following supplies are provided at no cost to you (while supplies last):

  • weather-proof signs
  • pet waste bag dispenser
  • supply of 500 bags

The association, apartment owner/manager or homeowner is responsible for installing the station, keeping the sign maintained and the dispenser filled with bags.

If your neighborhood could use a pet waste station, ask your association of complex manager to fill out a Pet Waste Station Sponsor Agreement (PDF). For more information about this program, refer to the Pet Waste Station Flyer (PDF) or contact Aaron Hussmann or call 425-587-3857.

More Information

Pet Waste Flyer (PDF) - Information on pet waste in Kirkland.

Animal Licenses- Information on licensing your dog or cat in Kirkland.

Washington Department of Ecology Dog Poop Page- Information on pet waste and water quality.

Portions of the City of Kirkland's Pet Waste Outreach are funded by a grant from the King Conservation District.links to external site 

King Conservation District Logo small

Public Works
Engineering
123 5th Avenue, Kirkland WA 98033
T. 425-587-3800 | F. 425-587-3807
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Operations & Maintenance
915 8th St, Kirkland WA 98033
T. 425-587-3900 24/7 | F. 425-587-3902
Mon-Fri, 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

General Inquiries - Contact us via the: 
Our Kirkland Customer Service Portal