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Kirkland News Room

Open House to Preview Experience of Traveling Along Totem Lake Connector Bridge

Contact: Christian Knight
Public Works/Capital Improvement Program
cknight@kirklandwa.gov
(425) 587-3831

KIRKLAND, Wash. – The City of Kirkland is inviting residents and stakeholders to witness the Totem Lake Connector’s design progression during an open house on Wednesday, February 7 at the Kirkland Justice Center. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. and continues until 8:30 p.m. in the Totem Lake Room at 11750 NE 118th St. 

Kirkland’s staff will be soliciting the public’s feedback and will convey that feedback to the City Council.

The meeting begins with a 30-minute drop-in session, followed by a formal, 20-minute presentation at 7 p.m. about the pedestrian and bicycle bridge’s most recently planned features. 

One of the planned features is the overlook, which will taper in width as it extends north toward the lake giving those who walk to its end the feeling that they’re walking off into space.

The City Council reviewed this proposal for the overlook during a December 12 study session (view a video of the session here) as well as options for the hand-railing, lighting and a more traditional view point along the bridge.

“What appeals to me about the overlook is that it makes you feel like you are walking the plank,” said Councilmember Jon Pascal, Chair of Public Works, Parks and Human Services Committee.

The reward for walking the plank will be sweeping views of Totem Lake. 

The design team expects to complete the design process by April 2018 and construction can begin as funding becomes available. 

Meanwhile, Kirkland’s staff continues to pursue grant-funding that would pay for much of the bridge’s construction costs. 

City Council chose the Skipping Stone concept for the Totem Lake Connector’s basic design at its June 6, 2017 regular meeting. 

The Skipping Stone was the public’s top choice and one of the least expensive concepts, according to the preliminary engineering cost estimate.

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